Tweetchat: #ClothesToDieFor

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After watching Clothes To Die For on BBC Two this week and interviewing the documentary’s director Zara Hayes about the programme, CSF hosted a Tweetchat on the issues raised by the film and the wider problems within the fashion industry. @sustfash, @DilysWilliams and @LCF London discussed trust, politics, values, education, change, and even Marx with a variety of participants.

The documentary made us think about the very human side of fashion production – hearing the voices of makers was powerful and moving yet, unfortunately these important voices are all too often drowned out in the rush of consumption. We wondered how hearing these voices might have impacted those watching.


Giving a voice to the survivors of Rana Plaza was something that the director Zara Hayes was keen to do.

We were also interested in exploring ideas around value, it was clear from the programme that the workers respected and valued their jobs and the garments that they made. Just like the young women on the programme we can all remember spending our first pay packet on a much coveted item – how then do consumers value these same garments once they own them? (This is something that the Local Wisdom project explores in more detail).

There were many voices highlighting positive work and the opportunity that fashion affords for us to encourage Better Lives and how through education and politics changes can be made:

Thank you for all those who joined us, we really enjoyed hearing everyone’s thoughts and opinions on such an important topic.